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Author Topic: Ural one year review  (Read 268 times)
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Metalcarver
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« on: December 07, 2017, 05:46:34 PM »

I bought my 2014 Ural Gear Up used a bit over a year ago.  This was about 6 months after a stroke that stopped me from riding on two wheels.  I put over 8,000 Km ~ 5,000 miles on it and maintenance so far has been minimal.  Oil and tires.  Changed from the street style Duro 308 to the Duro trials style 307 about midway and will need to change the pusher tire in a thousand miles or so again.  I ran it out of gas once and the fuel pump lost it's prime.  Had to pay fool's tax because in trying to run some gas through the pump I broke a plastic nipple on the left throttle body and was immediately stopped.  Didn't realize it in the bush but there's a quick disconnect on the side of the fuel pump, but well, now I know...

After reaching the 10k Km mark everything really started working smoothly. Shifting is more precise and the engine quieter. Kind of a saying among Uralistas that the owners do the final machining.  Unsettling if you are used to Japanese bikes, to change the oil and see the metalflake texture swirling in the used oil.  The engine is a push rod OHV and really sounds busy above 4k rpm but you get used to it.  Power and performance is OK below 50 mph.  It will hold 45mph on steep highway grades but you might be in 3rd gear.  Same with headwinds.  Above 50 mph it's like pushing a big sheet of plywood flat.  You would have to double the horsepower (41) to get much more performance.  On the few freeway stretches I was on I could get to 60 -65 mph so it wasn't too scary but Idaho freeways are 80mph and the big trucks are going 75.  At that speed on a hot day the engine gets very hot so I have an auxilliary oil cooler that I will be installing over the winter.  Same with high altitude back country, not a lot of air to keep the cylinders cool.  Took it up as high as 11,000 ft (3300m)and the fuel injection kept the motor running smoothly. If you are going up a back road that requires you to be in second gear and you have to stop, you are going to have trouble getting started again.  First gear is just way too high for mountain country.  If you are going up a hill that requires first gear and you have to stop, you are just going to have to back down and try again.  Lots of things are bolted together so it pays to check rattles.  You have to keep an eye on things more than most modern bikes.  The best comparison I have is to a 1968 International 5/8 ton crew cab I used to own.  It was built hell for stout and would rattle and crash all the way down back roads.  It was made from pieces from every manufacturer on earth.  And it just kept going.  With a bit of help.  I could give it a tune-up with a screwdriver and small wrench.  Adopt the same mind set and you'll do fine on a Ural.

Oh, and it's a blast.  You take a much bigger tent and you eat like royalty.  I never rode motocross, or aspired to, so gravel, sand, and mud were distinctly unpleasant on two wheels. Now I just put it in 2wd and keep going.  Just putting along, in the middle of nowhere, happier than a pig in poop.

The following link shows my travels on the Ural.  Way too much pavement but weather and time factored in.  It should open up a page in Google Maps.  If you hit the download icon you can save it to your computer and it will load in Google Earth.  Be sure to switch to satellite view and you can zoom in to see ruts in the road.  Yellow lines are paved roads. Orange lines are dirt roads. Once you've loaded it in to Google Earth you can save any of the individual tracks and save them as .kml files.  Then take that file to http://www.gpx2kml.com and convert it to gpx for your gps.

Map:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/15XJ22KqC3LwBcPVuK4xUOQ0JHjG0v_7Q/view?usp=sharing

Ride reports for the individual Ural trips are posted around RDS under metalcarver (or just yell HEY STUPID! and I'll respond)
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Kosmic
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2017, 07:00:43 PM »

Thank you Metalcarver! Your review gives me a real good understanding of level of care and feeding a Ural should get. I've been able to keep antique Indians running, and am rebuilding one now... so I get the picture!
By the way, what is the ride like as far as using ones upper body to steer a Ural?
Especially in off-road situations? Are you more tired after piloting the Ural all day than compared to the DL 650?
Thank you!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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Metalcarver
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2017, 07:22:18 PM »

Thank you Metalcarver! Your review gives me a real good understanding of level of care and feeding a Ural should get. I've been able to keep antique Indians running, and am rebuilding one now... so I get the picture!
By the way, what is the ride like as far as using ones upper body to steer a Ural?
Especially in off-road situations? Are you more tired after piloting the Ural all day than compared to the DL 650?
Thank you!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The seat made all the difference.  At first it was 6 hours and no more thankew!  Once I put the HD police solo seat on it I put in some 12 hour days and was more pooped than driving a car and less pooped than the Vstrom.  That big fairing stops ALL the wind ... well most.  Upper body is mostly punching the bars back and forth.  Only need to lean on turns that are a bit faster than true conservatism will allow,  then there's off camber side hills as described in the Spitslap report.  Definite pucker factor.
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Voltar
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« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2017, 05:23:45 PM »

Great write up and thanks for the follow up! 
Looking forward to more Ural talk.  I think they're cool.  lurk
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jhampshire
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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2017, 03:19:17 PM »

Thanks for taking the time to share your experience. I like the idea of a sidecar and have some experience.  I am thinking of doing a KLR or other chain drive sidecar. Do you think two wheel drive is essential? I do not do the real rough stuff, just gravel and dirt roads.
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Metalcarver
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2017, 05:47:05 PM »

2wd definitely not necessary.  I've only used it in some really iffy places like this:



and this:



For 95% of my riding it's in 1wd.

I knew of a guy in Alaska who put a hack on a KLR and he went pretty much everywhere.  Big tent and ate really good too.  There's been a number of hacks on Vstroms but heavy steering.  DMC sidecars makes triple trees for most bikes for less trail.
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Stovebolt
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« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2018, 06:13:16 PM »

I'll show ya, "iffy," he said....      naughty             lol              ricky

Great review, Dave. 

By the way, if we ride a project together, we won't get muddy, will we? Just askin'...

Your images are tremendous!

Happy New Year...

Stovey
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